i have chosen gale
one night of fire, one shot at glory

(Source: coalheartedgirl)

October 1st | 37 notes | Reblog
irregular reminder  # bye  
October 1st | 10 notes | Reblog
Mental illness is like fighting a war where the enemy’s strategy is to convince you that the war isn’t actually happening.
- Kat (via insanity-and-vanity)

(Source: scootaloo-pootaloo)

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October 1st | 207,190 notes | Reblog

(Source: questionall)

October 1st | 793 notes | Reblog
this  

If I had the power, I would ask all the authors in the world to do Yuletide or something like it every year. Sign up for a fic exchange and write some porn for a stranger; tailor your stories to an audience of one, let go of the long-form plots and the careful wide-spectrum appeal, embrace the joy of spending a hundred words on Carlos’s perfect hair or Buffy’s perfect shoes or Jo’s perfect knives. Remember the joy of waiting for one person to open a story and see what it contains.

Because fanfic is joy. Fanfic is fixing the things you see as broken, and patching the seams between what’s written and what is not, and giving characters who got cheated out of their happy endings another chance. There was a time, not that long ago as we measure things, where all fiction was what we would now call “fan fiction.” Shakespeare didn’t come up with most of his own plots. He wrote plays about the stories people already loved. We didn’t get a thousand versions of “Snow White” accidentally: people changed that story to suit themselves, and no one said they weren’t storytellers, or looked down on them for loving that core of red and black and white, of apples and glass and snow.

Seanan McGuire, “Let’s Talk About Fanfic.”

(hat tip to kassrachel for the link!)

(Source: fanculturesfancreativity)

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October 1st | 2,117 notes | Reblog

HAND IN HAND WE ROAM “I’d choose you. In a hundred lifetimes, in a hundred worlds, in any version of reality, I’d find you and I’d choose you.”

// a mix for detached lovers joined by the harmonized beating of their poisoned hearts. to those who long for each other like paramours separated by life and death, and those whose touch ignites the blood in your veins and imprints the touch of a melancholic ghost on your skin; we need each other like a wolf needs a sheep: to slaughter and devour whole. {listen} {download & how to}

October 1st | 1,585 notes | Reblog
cute  # otp ambitions  # stop me  
October 1st | 91 notes | Reblog

(Source: thirdhemsworth)

October 1st | 83 notes | Reblog

inksplattersandearlyhours:

I think one of the reasons the Harry Potter Epilogue was so poorly received was because the audience was primarily made up of the Millennial generation.

We’ve walked with Harry, Ron and Hermione, through a world that we thought was great but slowly revealed itself to be the opposite. We unpeeled the layers of corruption within the government, we saw cruelty against minorities grow in the past decades, and had media attack us and had teachers tell us that we ‘must not tell lies’. We got angry and frustrated and, like Harry, Ron and Hermione, had to think of a way to fight back. And them winning? That would have been enough to give us hope and leave us satisfied.

But instead. There was skip scene. And suddenly they were all over 30 and happy with their 2.5 children.

And the Millennials were left flailing in the dust.

Because while we recognised and empathised with everything up to that point. But seeing the Golden Trio financially stable and content and married? That was not something our generation could recognise. Because we have no idea if we’re ever going to be able to reach that stage. Not with the world we’re living in right now.

Having Harry, Ron and Hermione stare off into the distance after the battle and wonder about what the future might be would have stuck with us. Hell, have them move into a shitty flat together and try and sort out their lives would have. Have them with screaming nightmares and failed relationships and trying to get jobs in a society that’s falling apart would have. Have them still trying to fix things in that society would have. Because we known Voldemort was just a symptom of the disease of prejudice the Wizarding World.

But don’t push us off with an ‘all was well’. In a world about magic, JK Rowling finally broke our suspension of disbelief by having them all hit middle-class and middle-age contentment and expecting a fanbase of teenagers to accept it.

Also. Since when was ‘don’t worry kids, you’re going to turn out just like your parents’ ever a happy ending? Does our generation even recognise marriage and money and jobs as the fulfillment of life anymore? Does our generation even recognise the Epilogue’s Golden Trio anymore?

October 1st | 40,537 notes | Reblog

(Source: theferocity)

October 1st | 153,119 notes | Reblog
so cute  # so relevant  # lol  
Forth →
FZ